Thursday, May 26, 2011

May Wildflowers...



Ox-Eye Daisy 'Leucanthemum vulgare'--The meaning of its scientific name is "common white flower"--I happen to love the fact that it's common! Our Missouri roadsides and fields are covered with these long blooming wildflowers right now and the sight is anything but common!


Tradescantia ohiensis 'Ohio Spiderwort'--A Missouri native plant that is commonly found in prairies, wood margins, meadows, along roundsides...  One of my favorites-I love its morning blooms, which unfortunately only open for one day.



Robin's Plantain 'Eigeron pulchellus'--I bought this native wildflower last year at the annual Master Gardener Plant Sale and it's quickly become one of my favorites. The plant itself reminds me of Lamb's Ear, the leaves are short and somewhat fuzzy, but the best part is when it shoots up a wonderful daisy like bloom during April  through June..


Two-Flowered Cynthia 'Krigia biflora'--Native to the US, found in open woods, near streams, in fields and meadows, generally south of the Missouri River.  I found this wildflower for the first time this year along the bank of the lake (or 3 acre pond) by my property..


Pipevine 'Aristolochia tomentosa'--Host plant of the Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly. This is the fourth year for this vine in my butterfly garden.  Last year was the first year that it bloomed and the first time that I a Pipevine larva--actually, I had hundreds of caterpillars!  This spring it's loaded with blooms and I'm sure the butterflies will be visiting it soon...


Multiflora Rose, Japanese Rose 'Rosa mulriflora'--Not a native, but this thorny bush is present in almost every field around my property and blooms profusely during the months of May and June. It was originally introduced from Asia and planted as a fence-row, an impenetrable, "living" fence.  This species now is considered to be an invasive in agricultural lands, pastures, and native settings from the Midwest to the East Coast.  I can attest that it is a huge, difficult task to remove one of these "impenetrable" rose bushes! Definitely a "wild" flower...


Eastern Beebalm 'Monarda bradburyan'--I'm not that much of a fan of Monardas because of their habit of re-seeding like crazy, but this native Missouri Beebalm was listed as a 2008 Plant of Merit so I suppose I should give it the respect that it's earned.  It thrives in poor, dry acidic soil and bees/butterflies are often in abundance during its long blooming season... 



Blue Wild Indigo 'Baptisia ausralis'--A member of the pea family, this native perennial has had many uses throughout the years.  Also know as "Rattleweed," Indian children would use the dried pods with the loose seeds inside as rattles.  The Cherokee Indians made a tea from it that was used to prevent vomiting and it was also used as a source of blue dye for their clothing.


Since it's Wildflower Wednesday at Clay and Limestone it seems like the appropriate time to share my favorite wildflower guide.  In fact, if I had a top-ten book-list when it comes to gardening, wildflowers, etc....  Missouri Wild Flowers by Edgar Denison, would be near the top of the list.  I love how the book is divided into flower colors with beautiful photos and detailed descriptions that makes it quick and easy to identify any unknown wildflowers or native plants...
For info on donating to the disaster relief effort arising from the recent tornado that devastated the near-by community of Joplin, Missouri, visit Convoy of Hope.


15 comments:

  1. Oxeye daisies have gotta be my all time favorite flower. I've got packets of seeds but for some reason haven't had time to sow them yet. You've reminded me now so I'll do it this weekend.
    Sure hope you're ok with all that devastating weather you've been having.

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  2. Dear Rebecca, Ox-eyed daisy is one of my favorites, too. But the multi-flora rose is a terrible problem on our property. Still, for a few days each year when it is in bloom, it is so pretty. P. x

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  3. Even the chicken coop has a green roof ;~)

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  4. A wonderful WW post and I loved the automatic chicken feeder video. It reminds me of the piano playing chickens I used to see when we visited those road side attractions in the Ozarks. gail ps Love Ox-Eyes, too.

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  5. Hi Rebecca, thanks so much for stopping by my blog. I love your variety of wildflowers! How nice to have that book of Missouri wildflowers. I have one wildflower book of my area of South Carolina, but think I need more!

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  6. Love the wildflower picks, and the Ohio Spiderwort is really pretty. I'm glad you captured those beautiful blooms--too bad they only open for one day.

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  7. what a lovely group of wildflowers Rebecca, I love the daisy flower so love the oxeye daisies mine are only in bud, I like the Robin's plantain I never knew there is a plantain with daisy flowers, I also really like the spiderworts I am seeing on people's blogs, Frances

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  8. Love that pipevine, such an interesting flower! Great post.

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  9. You have a beautiful blog! I will have to try Missouri Bee Balm for the dry wildflower meadow.

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  10. I'm growing pipevine for the first time this summer and I hope I have some blooms and butterflies! I love your list of wildflowers. But my favorite pix is the one of your coop with its green roof!! LOVE IT!!

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  11. Oh, how i love finding new gardeners that share the passion of Gardening! I host a garden party on Thursday's called Cottage Flora Thursday's...would love to have you come by & peek around & would love it even better if you'd link a garden post sometime? oxox,tracie

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  12. Lovely to see you appreciating your wildfowers - I think many of us Brits take ours for granted. We have some gorgeous hedgerow flowers in bloom at the moment, including oxeye daisies and wild orchids. Beautiful!

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  13. You have some beautiful Wildflowers, thanks for sharing. :) I love that Pipevine bloom, so cool looking.

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  14. Hi Rebecca,
    I'm glad I made it to your wildflower post. I love that pipevine! How cool! I hope your money plant does well. Mine didn't get very tall, but I have some other little plants, that will probably be larger and bloom next year. I've never heard of the Robin's Plantain. That is a sweet plant, too.

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  15. Gorgeous photos! I'm glad you've had luck attracting pipevine swallowtails. I think their spongey caterpillars are some of the cutest insects I've ever seen.

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