Saturday, January 14, 2012

Winter Interest - Coralberry

Also known as 'Buckbursh, Coralberry or Indian Currant'

Zone: 2-7
Height: 2-5 feet with arching stems-spreads by runners
Full sun to part shade
Flowers in spring (insignificant), Berries in fall (outstanding)

This native deciduous shrub can be found in almost every state east of Colorado. Because of its low growing-thicket forming nature, it's useful as a wildlife shelter in areas with little woody vegetation. I forget that this shrub is all over my property until the winter when its small purplish-red fruits appear. The berries must not be that appetizing to wildlife because they persist on the plant for most of winter. It eventually does serve as an emergency wildlife food later in the season--perhaps because other food sources have been depleted or because it takes several freezes to soften the fruit to make it more palatable. I'm not sure why it's not a sought after plant to add to the native garden, perhaps because it has a reputation among farmers as a "brush weed" in pastures...  Personally, it's one of my favorite native shrubs--especially during the winter...



For more photos of winter interest, visit the sites:  May Dreams Gardens, and Tootsie Time and Friday's Photo Blog Hop...







15 comments:

  1. It is beautiful in photos, i wish it is more palatable for wildlife too!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Love your blog!!!! Found you on Fertilizer Fri. I am now yur follower! 8^)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Popping over from Holly's blog hop to say hello. I think that bush has probably received so much bad press that it has put people off from growing it. It certainly looks as if it has impressive berries and a lovely seasonal colour too.

    ReplyDelete
  4. It's so nice to see a burst of color in winter. Beautiful images!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I really like coral berry and wanted to add it to my garden but didn't have room. Poo! LOVE your chickens! They would kick my dogs butts in a heartbeat. :o)

    ReplyDelete
  6. How pretty! We have some of this growing in our fencerow, and I never knew what it was. Have a great weekend!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Just found your blog through Toostie Fertilizer Friday. I am your newest follower. I hope you will stop by and follow along with me too. I love the color of that berry. It looks like it would dry well and be lovely to decorate with. Blessings!

    ReplyDelete
  8. The top photo is gorgeous. Never thought barbed wire could look so cool.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Beautiful photos of this under appreciated plant. What its berries lack in food value for birds and other wildlife, it more than makes up for at other times of the year. Though inconspicuous to us, in spring its tiny flowers attract a wide variety of pollinators. Also, Coralberry is a "Snowberry" and the primary host plant for Snowberry Clearwing Moths in many more southern latitudes.

    Symphoricarpos on Wikipedia
    Snowberry Clearwing Moths on BugGuide

    ReplyDelete
  10. What a beautiful color to have during the winter!
    Happy Garden Bloggers Bloom Day!
    Lea

    ReplyDelete
  11. This berry on the bush is just beautiful
    and as you said, it must look wonderful
    during the winter... I've never seen it.
    Great shots.
    Sandy

    ReplyDelete
  12. Great plant to showcase! What a pretty color the berries are. I'll have to be on the look out for this shrub. Happy GBBD!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Your coralberry is wonderful! I tried them early in my garden experience and they didn't perform well at all for me... yours are beautiful... Larry

    ReplyDelete
  14. Nice winter color interest. Happy GBBD.

    ReplyDelete

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...