Sunday, February 10, 2013

DIY Wine Bottle Bird-Feeders


I'm preparing a class for the Master Gardener chapter that I'm a member of on making bird-feeders utilizing natural sources, recycled materials and re-purposed items. Of course the best bird-feeder is what nature provides: nuts, seeds and fruit from native trees, shrubs and wildflowers (and native insects)... Here's my hand-out for my "bird" talk I give:  Creating a Bird Garden

But - this class is all about creating bird-feeders and I've been trying a few DIY feeders I've found on the Internet. Here's the link of the inspiration for this fun feeder: Michelob Bird feeder


The hardest part of this DIY feeder was learning how to drill a hole in a glass bottle...
Here's the steps in a nutshell:

  • Start with a diamond drill bit. We purchased one that's a little less than a 1/2 inch diameter. It works well for small seeds such as sunflower chips or safflower, but it's a little too small for sunflower seeds. 
  • The drill needs to stay lubricated with water so either have the bottle somehow submerged in water or have someone spray water at the bit during the drilling.
  • Start drilling at a 45° angle (have the drill on and go toward the glass--don't put the drill bit on the glass and then start the drill).
  • Slowly move the bit to a 90° angle. Avoid applying pressure (you're grinding or chipping away at the glass, not drilling).
  • Continue to spray water on the bit and stop a few times and clean the area off and apply more water.
  • It's a slow process... When you're close to the end, slow the speed of the drill down and mentally remember to go up with the drill and not push the drill through the bottle. ( I did that a few times and the bottle shatters). ~ Remember to wear protective eye glasses...
Carolina Chickadee
American Goldfinch ~ Cardinal waiting his turn...



Once the holes are drilled (one on each side), use epoxy to attach a plate or saucer to the bottom. To hang the bottle I wrapped a piece of 8 gauge copper wire around the top. A couple of the bottles had hinged stopper lids which made it even easier to add a wire to hang.


The blue bottle with the hinged top I found at the recycle center is Redstone Meadery Juniper Honey Wine. The clear bottle is a Lemonade bottle and The Winking Owl wine bottle was also from the recycle center - but I could have purchased it for less than $3.00 a bottle!


Cheers! ♥


American Goldfinch
Downy Woodpecker
Tufted Titmouse

Carolina Chickadee ~ Tufted Titmouse

I invite you to "like" my Facebook page to see all the Market happenings and my latest DIY projects! Click on this link:

Rebecca's Bird Gardens (Facebook)

Update! ~ Check out my new line of wine bottle bird-feeders in my Etsy shop! ♥ Click on this link:

Rebecca's Bird Gardens (Etsy)

Also, I'm moving most of my market updates, bird watching and DIY projects over to my Rebecca's Bird Gardens site...  Click on these links:

Rebecca's Bird Gardens (website)
Rebecca's Bird Gardens (blog)





Wine Bottle Bird-Feeder ~ "The Vineyard"
Outdoor Wednesday
Down Home Blog Hop
I'd Rather B Birdn'
Wild Bird Wednesday
Nature Notes
Clever Chick Blog Hop



73 comments:

  1. Really enjoying your series on homemade bird feeders. These are very cool! I love that the wine bottle's label is related to birds too. I have seen crafts with glass bottles and always wondered how you drill in them. Thanks for the tutorial and your helpful hints!

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  2. Those are great! Looks like the birds love them. (Stopping by from Clever Chicks)

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  3. That is so cute! I'm going to have to show my dad these. He's way more capable of drilling a hole in a wine bottle than me. :-)

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  4. Oh, I am loving these! I just HAVE to make one. Thanks for the info.

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  5. Wow I'm impressed!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

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  6. Marvelous!!!! So, tell me, the watering of the glass/bit keeps the glass from cracking? Is that the secret. Your feeders are stupendous. Colorful, bright and I'm sure the birds are attracted to them. By the way, do you sell them?

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    Replies
    1. Nope, not selling them... They would be a lot easier than some of the things we make to sell. On second thought, maybe I will sell a few!

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    2. ...The water keeps the bit from getting too hot. You can burn-up the bit (and ruin it) if it over heats.

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    3. Hello,

      I found one of your wonderful bird feeders on Pintrest, my father who was made to retire because of his health has fallen love with wine bottle crafts. I am trying to find the bottom threaded piece that holds in the see on the upside down blue wine bottle bird feeder. If you can please help me or anyone that knows the name of it and where I can get them for him.
      thanks!
      tjredd16@gmail.com please email me!

      Delete
  7. You are a kindred spirit indeed! I've been making bird feeders out of old plates, vases, candle holders, chandeliers and the like for the last week. I saw your linky on That DIY Party and new I had to swing by. Thanks for sharing! UpcycledStuff.blogspot.com

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  8. Love your bird feeders, especially the blue bottle. Looks like the birdies like them as well. Thanks for linking to me :)

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  9. They are pretty feeders, especially the colored glass bottles. Thanks for sharing. Have a happy day!

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  10. Those feeders look fun and I hope the birds like them!

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  11. Lovely pics indeed!
    http://amitaag.blogspot.in/2013/02/call-beach-by-any-other-name.html

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  12. Great feeders! I like birds and also environment, so I like your great echo-friendly idea about recycling wine bottle. ;)

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  13. Nice post. I think these could be a squirrel proof feeder!

    I'm surprised the birds went to the Owl feeder.

    Cheers and thanks for linking to WBW

    Stewart M - Melbourne

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  14. Oh I LOVE these. They are so cool looking and the birds seem to like them. I will have to try this as I think I have a wine bottle here for a change. Thank you for linking into Nature Notes this week...Michelle

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  15. Another great idea! The pictures of your satisfied customers prove they work just fine!
    Very nice photos!

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  16. This looks so cool I may have questions once I attempt this in the spring!!

    Thanks
    Liz
    http://funcraftysavymom.blogspot.com/

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  17. These are awesome. I'm not all into cutting glass (just not proficient at it) but I think even clear plastic bottles will work for this. If I can get the glass cutting down I'm gonna try this.

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  18. I fill my bottle with water and cork it. Then use a piece of Duct Tape where I want to drill, this keeps the drill from slipping. The water will not come out of the bottom and it keeps the drill bit wet.

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    Replies
    1. Great tip that I am going to use! Thanks!

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  19. How did you preserve the bottle labels?

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    Replies
    1. I'm trying to come up with an answer to this... Mod Podge has a product for paper and one also for exterior use (might just work). I'll post the results later.

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    2. Try clear acrylic spray to seal and protect.

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  20. I love the feeders! I make hummingbird feeders with wine bottles but never thought of this. I will definitely give it a try!

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  21. Why not just use a glass cutter?

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    Replies
    1. Holes are drilled for the birdseed...

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  22. Thanks for sharing yours too.I'm trying to make some wine bottles and crystaldishes too.For my beautiful birds.Hope i do well as you.

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  23. I need to to thank you for this wonderful read!! I certainly enjoyed every
    little bit of it. I’ve got you book marked to look at new stuff you post…

    Also visit my web site :: green building council

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  24. On the Tufted Titmouse feeder, how did you keep the wire from slipping off the bottle?
    Denise

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    Replies
    1. 8-gauge copper wire. It's bendable (takes a little effort), and strong. It will stay in place (wrapped around the neck of the bottle a few times)...

      Delete
  25. BACKYARDFEATHEREDFRIENDS.COMMay 22, 2013 at 3:18 PM

    GREAT PROJECT!!!!! I LOVE THE IDEA.
    SUSAN

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  26. My sister-in-law has been experimenting with wine bottle feeders. I'll have to share this link with her!

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  27. I ended up on this page by googling homemade bird feeders. I loved this idea so I kept this page open so I could come back to it later. While watching TV, I glanced at the screen and noticed Ozarks and Missouri in your favorite sites. I went to your "About Me" page and discovered you are in Springfield...I'm from Springfield but now live in Branson! So I just wanted to say hello! Can't wait to make a few of these!

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  28. Love this! My daughter is getting married at an Audubon conservatory next july - this would be perfect as favors with their label on the bottle :). I'll try one before I send out a facebook request for bottles... although we do have a big recycling station nearby, wonder if I could get them there...

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  29. Where did you find your copper wire at? Did they have different sizes? Also this are wonderful!!!

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    Replies
    1. Home Depot. 6 or 8 gauge - I think the 6 gauge works the best, but the 8 gauge is easier to bend. Both are less than a dollar a foot...

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  30. Great project. When I drill into glass or shells they all do one thing. Shatter! I keep a water bottle with me with room temp water in it. As you drill keep the drill bit very wet, it keeps the heat down and helps. This is the same trick they use in tile to keep it from braking.

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  31. any word on whether the modge lodge worked or how to preserve the labels for outdoor use?

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    Replies
    1. Yes! Any word? I have figured out the drilling,glueing, hanging, but would like to know if the modge podge worked!! I used Polyurethane but that didn't work. Now I am thinking some type of plastic-y cover that adheres to the bottle.......

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    2. Just had an idea! I think I will try using Clear adhesive shelf paper to cover wine labels. It's pretty sturdy stuff. I will let you know how it does in the "elements!"

      I have a FB page I just started: https://www.facebook.com/dkwinedesigns

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    3. OK I have tried the Clear Adhesive contact paper. So far so good. It kept the water away, now living in TX, we will see how the sun/heat fares on it....I'll keep ya posted.

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    4. Sounds like a good idea! I tried clear label paper, but it was hard to make it look nice. Let me know how the contact paper works!

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  32. Are the squirrels a problem??

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    Replies
    1. Squirrels can always be a problem. :(
      They don't seem to like safflower seeds as much or you could use a baffle hung above the feeder that is specifically design to keep the squirrels from reaching the feeder.

      Or you could just call it a wildlife feeder! :)

      Delete
  33. Hi, just wanted to tell you, I liked this article. It was inspiring. Keep on posting!

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  34. Very Cool!! I ran out to Home Depot and am in the middle of making one out of a decorative bottle. It's very thick and I've run through two rechargeable batteries. My only question is does water collect in the dish? I was thinking I could try to drill a couple holes in the dish as well.

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    Replies
    1. FYI- I used the same glass bit to drill a hole in the ceramic saucer and it worked. I also didn't need help because I just kept a small amount of water in the saucer.

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    2. If you have an electric drill (not rechargeable) it does work better because the whole drilling process is so slow. The same drill bit will also work on ceramic or glass saucers.... :)

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  35. Thanks for this great idea! What sort of epoxy are you using?

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  36. I love this bird feeder - found it on Pinterest. It's my hope to create one -Carole

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  37. Could you let me know where to purchase the swing bottle stoppers in quantity. Thank you.

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    Replies
    1. Sorry John, I don't know of any place. I just found those bottles at the recycle center...

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  38. Are the edges of the holes very sharp? Do you sand them somehow to smooth them? Where can one find the seed port/perches like on the blue bottle? I've looked all over and can't find them.

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  39. Where do you find the copper perches like the ones pictured on the blue and green bottle at the end?

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  40. Another suggestion on opening the bottle for seeds to flow. You could cut the bottom of the bottle with a tile wet saw or use the string/lighter fluid/cold water method. Once you cut the bottle (don't forget to sand the sharp edges where it was cut), you could glue spacers onto the saucer before you glue the saucer to the bottle. That way you could make the spacers fit the size seeds you want to use. Just a thought.

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  41. Would love to know this also. would like to make one for my mom

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  42. Would like to know where to find the copper perches. Would like to make one for my mom

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  43. Please make a post about how you made the ones with the perches. Did you drill a different size hole? Where do you get your hardware like the hangers and the perches? Very cute idea

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  44. I agree, please at least let us know what the perch insert piece is called so that we can find it. If it's a trade secret, I understand. I will make my own.

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  45. I have no trade secrets. lol! I have searched to find a site to purchase the copper feeding ports separately, but haven't had any luck. What I do is purchase cheaper plastic feeders with metal ports and use them. The ones in the photos above are from a discontinued feeder from Kmart. The feeders require drilling several holes in the wine bottles - which is pretty difficult without a drill press. There are more photos on this post: http://rebeccasbirdgardensblog.blogspot.com/2014/01/wine-bottle-bird-feeders-vineyard.html

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  46. Drilling the bottom of the bottle seems like the hardest part to do. Thanks for sharing.

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  47. You are a kindred spirit indeed! I've been making bird feeders out of old plates, vases, candle holders, chandeliers and the like for the last week. I saw your linky on That DIY Party and new I had to swing by. Thanks for sharing! UpcycledStuff.blogspot.com
    شركة عزل اسطح بالرياض
    شركة عزل خزانات بالرياض

    ReplyDelete

  48. You are a kindred spirit indeed! I've been making bird feeders out of old plates, vases, candle holders, chandeliers and the like for the last week. I saw your linky on That DIY Party and new I had to swing by. Thanks for sharing! UpcycledStuff.blogspot.com
    شركة مقاولات بالرياض
    تغليف اثاث
    نقل اثاث بالرياض
    تنظيف خزانات بجدة
    شركة تخزين اثاث بجدة
    تنظيف شقق بجدة
    رش المبيدات حشرية مكة

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  49. Thank you so much for sharing not only the pictures of your beautiful feeders but also the directions. Just an idea to add: I got my bottles from a local restaurant. They were happy to give them to me since they just throw them away!

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  50. In looking for some perches and seed ports, I just found these Perky Pet replacement seed ports. I wonder if they would work?
    http://www.birdfeeders.com/store/parts/seed-feeders/seed-ports-and-perches

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    Replies
    1. The only problem with these perches is that the rim isn't large enough to cover the edge of the drilled hole...

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  51. I have been making these feeders for over thirty years now and have found that a carbide tipped electric engraver works well for boring holes in the glass bottles. First mark where you want the holes located with a piece of masking tape and put a dot with a sharpie roughly the size of the hole desired on it. Then use the engraver to outline the small circle onto the bottle. Once the diameter is established start chipping away at the center of the circle working outwards. Keep making circular shapes within the perimeter removing layers of glass until you have a hole clear through. Once you have a hole started you can enlarge the hole to the size required by working the edge evenly. I use a piece of round stock to gage the hole size but the back side of an ordinary drill bit works just fine. Using this method reduces the likelihood of bottle breakage and you have more control of hole placement especially when beginning the hole and there is no need for using water and the mess it can create. Be sure to wear safety glasses and leather gloves to protect yourself from sharp glass shards that may be produced. I also place the project piece in a plastic wash basin to help contain the mess that is created.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for sharing. This method would be great if you were trying to preserve the label - the water does make a mess...

      Delete

  52. I agree, please at least let us know what the perch insert piece is called so that we can find it. If it's a trade secret, I understand. I will make my own.

    فوائد الزعتر

    ReplyDelete

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